Micro Sync II Review with Tom Keller

Hey everyone,

We got a chance to send Tom Keller one of our Micro Sync II remote firing units to test out with his steel wool photography. For those of you who don’t know what the Micro Sync II is, it’s a lightweight wireless system for remotely firing and syncing strobes, flashes and cameras. Check out the video at the end of Tom’s review to learn more! So here’s the review that Tom sent us after he had taken the MS II out on a few trips… and he sent pictures!!!

Tom: When I first received the Micro Sync II I thought it would come in quite handy with the
Steel Wool Photography I shoot. It’s light weight, made from plastic and metal and
pretty durable. At first I was having some issues with the receiver turning on and
syncing but after some quick trouble shooting it turned on and I haven’t had a problem
since.

I have never used a remote trigger before so I was eager to try it out. Since I typically
go out with a partner, it was exciting to come up with new ideas to take advantage of
MSII. We took the remote camping with us at Lake Tahoe to test our creativity and the
device and it turned out great. Because of the landscape, it was not ideal to travel from
the camera to the desired position for either of us so MSII made this shot of “Sleeping
under the Sparks” possible.

Photo 1

Just recently I took this photo “Light Keeper.” I was able to take multiple shots in a row
with MSII to allow the model to change poses without wasting time and sparks from
the steel wool.

Photo 2

Although I typically have a partner with me I occasionally go out alone and this is
when Micro Sync II really helps me out. It allows me to better prepare for photos farther away and not have to race against a timer.

Photo 3
Photo 4

All in all I think it’s a great product. It works great for lone photographers taking multiple shots at a distance or for close up group shots. It allows a photographer to get more creative with his work because there is one less restriction.

Photo 5

Here’s how I’ve incorporated the Micro Sync II into my photo shoots. My typical night shooting starts around 11pm. Once we arrive at a location, we set up the camera angle with Marissa standing where I plan on spinning. She helps focus the camera lens by shining a light at the camera. With the camera already in focus I then turn the camera off and take out the MSII, plug the firing cord into the receiver and then into the shutter release input. I then turn the camera back on to wake up the receiver and take a couple test shots before we start spinning. Lately, Marissa and I have been doing shots with her posing with props or silhouettes to switch it up a bit while I spin in the background. Once we’re both ready and sparks are flying, I use the remote in my other hand to trigger the camera to shoot. If sparks are still flying by the time the shutter closes, Marissa changes her pose and I’ll fire a second shot. The MSII really comes in handy in these situations when we’re both in the shot.
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For more information on the Micro Sync II watch the video below and visit the website: www.microsyncdigital.com

For more information on Tom Keller check out these links:
Tom’s previous post on Steel Wool Photography
Follow him on Facebook
Follow him on Instagram: @tomkellerphotography
Send him an email: Tommokeller@gmail.com

Become a part of out Instagram community by following @tamracphoto, and like us on Facebook to stay up with everything Tamrac!

Flaming Steel Wool Photography with Tom Keller

We love our Instagram community and wanted to spotlight the work of Tom Keller who’s been doing some really cool things with steel wool, his camera, and lighter! So here’s Tom’s images and what he has to say about them. Enjoy!

I first came across a picture of steel wool on Instagram. I’ve never seen this
before and was very intrigued by it. After doing some research my Fiancée Marissa and I
went out and got the necessities. We experimented in our back yard that night but
quickly got the hang of it and ventured out into the nearby neighborhoods. Places like
parks, bridges, rivers, and train yards offer interesting backgrounds and features to
photograph with. It’s usually j ust the two of us with one spinning while the other sets the
timer and possess.

001

The spinning vortex is one of the first pictures that Marissa and I shot in the backyard. I
started spinning at the back of our yard and randomly decided to walk towards the
camera while spinning. This became one of many successful experiments.

002

After a couple weeks of experimenting with steel wool my fiancé and I started getting
creative. We came up with the idea of using an umbrella to get a force field effect
creating this image under a bridge here in Sacramento; “Protector of Art.”

003

The exposures we use are between 15-20 seconds long and it can be tricky posing still
for that long. In this colorful picture done in my backyard, you can see that I shifted
positions while spinning causing a partial ghost effect but my fiancé did great.

004

Spinning orbs are amazing; it’s like an explosion of sparks! The way to spin an orb is to
find a set point on the ground (like a leaf or rock) and spin slowly around it with the
bottom of your spin hitting the top of that point. We found this Underpass interesting and
did a lot of experimenting here.

005

This silhouette shot was taken in a large storm tunnel in Houston Texas. I posed while
Marissa (my partner in life and in late night shenanigans) spun behind me creating the
silhouette and flaming water effect. We both got soaked this night, but getting down and
dirty is all part of the fun.

006

I always carry my GR1 Ruck from GoRuck and Canon EOS Rebel T2i with a Sigma 10-
20mm lens. After a lot of trial and error throughout the months, I developed a plywood
cut out that mounts 12 spinners and fits perfectly in my Ruck. This makes for an easy
“reload,” to cut down wasted time during the night. The actual “spinners” are made up of
an ordinary wire cooking whisk stuffed with 0000-000 gauge steel wool tied on a long
rope. A few other musts are a tri-pod, headlamps (not only to see but to focus the
camera) and lighters. Also, be sure to only spin after rains, during the winter months, or
near large bodies of water to prevent possible fires.

007

This over head spin was done alone in Lake Tahoe, CA. I learned from this experience
that the mechanics of this photography works much better with a partner. For this
picture I had my headlamp positioned facing the rocks to get a little more color from
them.

The Steelwool Photography community is still small but very innovative and filled
with great artist. Marissa and I have come up with many new ideas using the various
techniques we’ve developed so far and can’t wait to experiment with them this summer
in new adventurous places.

-Tom Keller, TK Photography

To keep up with Tom and his fiery shenanigans:
Follow him on Facebook
Follow him on Instagram: @tomkellerphotography
Send him an email: Tommokeller@gmail.com

For a cool tutorial on steel wool photography from our friends at Photojojo, Click Here!

Become a part of out Instagram community by following @tamracphoto right now!